Communities React Well to JS and Node.js Foundations Intent to Merge

Last month, the JS (JavaScript) Foundation and the Node.js Foundation announced an intent to merge. In case you’re unfamiliar with the (rather misleading) term, it doesn’t actually mean that anything has been planned or decided. Rather, the foundations are asking for feedback from their communities, which overlap to an extent already, on the possibility of merging.

While not exactly the explosive news that IBM buying Redhat was, companies and individuals who support one or both foundations have been reacting on their blogs. IBM, as a founding member of the JS Foundation, fully supports the merge.

“We believe the end result will be a stronger and more vibrant JavaScript ecosystem,” wrote two of IBM’s developers on its blog.

The npm Blog writer is “psyched.” They write that the merge “removes an unnecessary barrier to innovation.”

The foundations’ stated reason for merging in their public announcement is that an “increased collaboration in the JavaScript ecosystem is more important than ever to sustain continued and healthy growth.”

Reaction to this proposed merger is mild and mostly positive, and most agree that the merge would achieve this primary goal. According to The npm Blog and articles like the one in TechCrunch, developers can look forward to more streamlined tools, greater consistency in processes and policies, and a wider-spread interest of sponsors in all JavaScript projects.

“I think it is a great thing that the two foundations are going to merge,” said Emanuele DelBono, author of Syncfusion’s Node.js Succinctly. “They overlap in many ways and joining strengths will result in improved collaboration and a broader adoption of Node and JavaScript. So, good news for us as developers! We can be quite sure that the JavaScript language will become even better and more used in the near future.”

Further goals in the announcement on the Linux Foundation site, which hosts both foundations, are:

  • Enhanced operational excellence.
  • Streamlined member engagement.
  • Increased collaboration across the JavaScript ecosystem and affiliated standards bodies.
  • An “umbrella” project structure that brings stronger collaboration across all JavaScript projects.
  • A single, clear home available for any project in the JavaScript ecosystem.

We know a lot of our developers work with JavaScript, and many use Node.js, as well. What do you think of this merge? Can you spot any pitfalls, or do you agree with the majority that this is a good thing? Let us know in the comments below or on Facebook or Twitter.

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